Desserts · Fruits

Raspberry Coconut Macaroons

raspberry coconut macaroons 2

An unexpected but lovely rendition of the normally overly sweet macaroon (not to be confused with the macaron). The raspberry tempers the sweetness of the coconut and the dark ground grounds the sweet and tart flavor profile. It’s my new favorite sweet treat to eat with the crisp edges and chewy centers. The recipes yields 50 mini bites so you can just eat one, and another, and another and still have enough to share.

 

raspberry coconut macaroons

Note: these macaroons freeze well but freeze without chocolate and dip in dark chocolate prior to serving.

INGREDIENTS

  • 14 ounces (400 grams) sweetened, flaked coconut
  • 2/3 cup (130 grams) granulated sugar
  • 3 large egg whites
  • Heaped 1/4 teaspoon flaked sea salt or level 1/4 teaspoon table salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1/2 pint (6 ounces, 170 grams or 1 1/4 cups) fresh raspberries (if washed, patted very dry)

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 325°F. Line two large baking sheets with parchment paper.

In a food processor, blend the coconut for a minute. Add sugar, blend another minute. Add egg whites, salt and almond extract and blend for another minute. Add raspberries and pulse machine on and off in short bursts until they are largely, but not fully, broken down. (I counted 13 pulses. I might have been a little obsessive, what with the counting.) Some visible flecks of raspberry here and there are great. When you open the machine, you’ll see some parts of the batter that are still fully white while others are fully pink. Resist stirring them together.

With a tablespoon measure or cookie scoop (I used a #70), scoop batter into 1-inch mounds. You can arrange the cookies fairly close together as they don’t spread, just puff a bit. Scooping a little of the pink batter and a little of the white batter together makes them look extra marble-y and pretty.

Bake cookies for 25 to 30 minutes, until they look a little toasted on top. Let them rest on the tray for 10 minutes after baking (or you can let them fully cool in place, if you’re not in a rush to use the tray again), as they’ll be hard to move right out of the oven. They’ll firm up as they cool, but still remain softer and less dry inside than traditional macaroons.

From smitten kitchen

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s